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Webcasts from Around the Country: 2017 Planning Webcast Series

Opportunity to earn CM Credits- FREE!

Webcast from Around the Country
2017 Planning Webcast Series

Upcoming Webcasts – all at 1 p.m. ET:

Over half of the world’s population now lives in cities, where built environment decisions endure for decades, impacting social and economic prospects for generations. In response, a new class of sustainability appraisal tools has emerged that gauge equity, resiliency, and resource efficiency at neighborhood, city, and urban component scales. These tools can provide stakeholders with inclusive and transparent systems that support and accelerate local leadership on critical issues of sustainability. In the face of a faltering national commitment, the use and advocacy of these tools by communities takes on even greater significance and urgency. The webinar will examine major U.S. tools for assessing the sustainability of neighborhoods, cities, and their components, including: 2030 Districts, APA Sustaining Places, EcoDistricts Protocol, Enterprise Green Communities, Envision for infrastructure, LEED for Neighborhoods, LEED for Cities & Communities, Living Community Challenge, STAR Community, Sustainable SITES, and WELL District. Each tool will be reviewed in terms of assessment scope, intended users, rating procedure, costs, and output. And a set of evaluation criteria will be presented for judging and selecting the best tools for community and neighborhood needs. Webinar learning objectives include: understanding the value of urban sustainability assessment, recognizing the qualities of an appraisal tool, learning the range of available tools, and knowing how to select a tool.

In 2015, with the Pope and tons of visitors heading to town, Philadelphia became the largest city in North America to legalize short-term residential rentals (such as ones listed on AirBnB, HomeAway.com, and through other booking agents).  With changes to the city’s zoning and tax code, a system was put into place that addressed the interests of property owners renting spare rooms and entire units, the guests they hosted, neighbors and traditional hotel operators.  An interdisciplinary group worked together to ensure local legislation matched the reality of activity already occurring and the needs of the community.  This session will cover the challenges faced and policy options considered, plus a comparison to other cities and counties across the United States.

Culture, tradition, sustainability and many aspects of contemporary quality of life are intertwined in uplifting old, shaping new, and bringing increased resilience to inclusive public spaces. An integration of approaches to inclusive public spaces is required as social, environmental, spatial and economic dimensions of equity are entangled. A driving force in global development, increased urbanization targets many cities for continued rapid growth, challenging the need to secure inclusive public space. The UN Sustainability Design Guidelines relate to this reality. With the burgeoning growth of population, it is critical to: recognize and broadly articulate the values of public space for quality of urban living; encourage local advocacy for public space quality, quantity, care and use; safeguard and improve existing urban public space; integrate green best practices; and plan for and create new open spaces, particularly in low-income areas. The application of good governance recognizes and acts on the linkage between public spaces and sustainable development, respects the legacy of public spaces, seeks to improve existing space, adds new vibrant public spaces and benchmarks local public space quantity, quality, distribution and access, so that inclusive public space is available to all. The United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 11, focused on ‘inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable cities’ (United Nations, 2015), provides a core target for inclusive public spaces and many other aspects of human settlements. Urban public spaces address all three pillars of sustainability: economy, environment and society.

Bikeshare systems require planning, proper funding, manpower, and a whole lot of public-private coordination to properly implement and operate. Hear the real story of two professionals (MPO Director and BikeShare Operator) that were in the trenches together, and the best practices and lessons learned from their experience launching and operating Zyp BikeShare.

Steve Whitman and Chris Parker will explore the many problems facing communities of all sizes, and the underlying issue of ecosystem services. They will explore how thinking holistically and using a systems perspective can provide a new way forward for communities. While planning documents may take a systems perspective, land use regulations seldom do. This integrated approach provides for the regeneration of lost ecosystem services, and the resulting projects will help your community become more adaptive and resilient over time. Case study examples will be shared to highlight how to apply this approach, and to serve as a call to action so more planners become part of this collaborative effort.

Click on the title links to register.  You can see the current listing of all webcasts at www.ohioplanning.org/planningwebcast.

CM credits can be claimed by looking up the sponsoring Chapter or Division as provider

Distance Education – These 2016 webcasts are available for viewing throughout 2017 for CM Distance Education credits:

Planning Ethics – Dealing with Problem Boards and Board Members – ETHICS. Event #9119060

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